Posts Tagged ‘vet’

Me and Bob Barker are like this X!

September 20, 2012

That was my fingers crossed, in case you were wondering about the X.  You remember from The Price is Right…. at the end of every show when Bob looks into the camera and says….

Well, we took Bob’s advice… against Ringo’s wishes.  There will be no baby wiener dogs sired from this house anymore.  I made the appointment for a Saturday morning… when I was out of town.  (See?  I’m the nice mom AND the smart mom!)  I left detailed instructions and came home to Mr. Weeney wearing the cone of shame.  He was a little whiny, but not bad.  Pain medicine in peanut butter was a slam dunk of a hit!  Come to find out, he also had baby teeth that were four months late in falling out so those were pulled too.  Rough day in doggy land.  Both ends.

Ringo is very loving… but not so bright.  Today was day #6 with the cone of shame and he is still running to the doggy door only to be stopped dead in his tracks by the cone that doesn’t fit through the door.  And to make matters worse, yesterday was his first birthday.  Nora asked if she could make him a puppy cake.  So sweet, but no.  She did pick out a chewy, noise-making stuffed raccoon for Ringo.  But it terrified the dog!  Made us all laugh.  Our other dog, Trixie, loved the raccoon and claimed the birthday gift as her own.

(Side note:  never in my first 35 years did I ever imagine that I would be a dog owner…. or blog the words “our OTHER dog”.  Inconceivable!)

And so, Ringo continues to slam the backs of our legs for four more days of doggy cone duty.  Never a dull moment in this house.

At least he can hold his chewy rawhide bone.

My Husband’s 1st and Only Attempt at giving Me Acupuncture

February 29, 2008

trixie

Meet Trixie.  She’s our four-year-old Rat Terrier. One day I noticed Trixie was not eating and she was hunching her little back, so I took her to the vet.  Seems she was dehydrated, had an obstruction in her intestines and needed an IV.  We have an insurance plan for our dog so the “visit” was covered…. just not anything during the “visit”, like IV or X-rays…. but we have SAVED $1,498 since joining the scam plan.  The X-rays revealed… well, not much, but closing time was approaching so we were required to move Trixie to an Emergency Vet Clinic.

My husband, Rick, met his wife, kids and dog at the clinic, where we were all ushered into a room with the “car salesman award winner” canine technician.  She knew all the buzz words and was in her element.  “On a scale of 1 to 10,” she spit out while waving her hands by her ears, “just looking at your dog, THIS IS A TEN.  She needs surgery!  NOW!”  Talk about high pressure sales. 

Rick calmly replied, “How much does that cost?” 

“With the required overnight stay, anesthesia and surgery, ONLY $1,500 to $1,800 plus the extra cost for calling the Dr. and the anesthesiologist in after hours.” 

“Now, hold on.  What happens if she doesn’t get surgery?”  I thought it was a valid question.  The pet tech was aghast at the suggestion of questioning her analysis of the situation.  She flatly told us that it was mandatory.  Rick’s next question threw me a bit.  He commented on how much better the dog was now looking, then whispered out the side of his mouth so the kids couldn’t hear him, “How much to put the dog down?”  I knew he wouldn’t do it, but I also knew there would be no $1,500 + extras surgery.

I left at that point to take one of the kids to some sort of lesson or practice. We all arrived home that night… even Trixie.  Rick refused to leave the dog in their care and was sent home with IV bags to be administered every 8 hours.  I quickly did the calculations and realized Rick would be at work during a few of those times.  I HATE needles.  That was the worse part of childbearing, in my opinion…. the IV in the hand.  Still makes me shudder.  I looked at my husband and relayed that I would not be playing nursemaid to the dog… especially if needles were involved… and I went to bed. 

Later Rick came and kindly asked me to at least hold the dog so he could give her the bag of fluid.  All went well…. the dog bed on the kitchen table with the docile animal lying still.  The needle was inserted… but the IV bag was just out of reach.  So as I’m holding the dog with the needle in her neck, Rick is balancing the IV tubes over my head while reaching for the bag of juice.  Whammo!  It happened so fast I couldn’t believe my own bloodshot eyes.  The needle came out of the dog and into the back of my hand… inches from my birthing IV entrance points.  I let go of the dog.  The needle fell to the floor, spraying liquid nutrition in short bursts on the tile, and I spoke clearly but quietly while holding my wound, “That’s it! I am going back to bed.”

I prayed that I wouldn’t get rabies, or scabies, or ringworm or fleas from the acupuncture treatment…. and I didn’t.  I’m still here to tell the story… but don’t ever ask me to help out with animal drug administrations!